Round Up: Am Law 100 Job Listings, Backstory and Future

I’m glad so many people like the Am Law jobs round-up. I figured I owed you a long-overdue explanation about the column – why I decided to create it and where it is moving. So, stick with me and you’ll find the latest round-up at the end of the post.1

Long, long ago, when I was a job seeker, I longed for a service that compiled all the job postings in one place. Why did I have to visit Martindale, Lawjobs, Monster, Emplawyernet, PSLawNet, Craigslist, Vault, and firm websites to find jobs? No wonder they recommend to take your job search as seriously as a full-time job.

Recruiting firms have it a little easier if they subscribed to any of the products offered by Leopard Solutions, which are nothing short of amazing. (May I add that Laura Leopard is a genius?) For example, Leopard Jobs compiles a database of open jobs at over 460 firms and 80 Fortune 500 companies daily. No, wait, twice per day. Plus, they’re easily searchable by geography or practice area. Couple that with the Leopard Lists, which publishes information on every firm’s attorneys (e.g., name, e-mail, graduation year, law school, undergrad, practice area, specialty, & clients) and, you’ve got a winning solution to match openings with viable candidates.

The only problem? Well, the Leopard List is pretty pricey. To have access to the job listings in the North East only, it costs $1,250/year. For recruiting firms who compete on inside hiring knowledge, the product’s well worth the price.

But what about the everyday consumer? The qualified candidate who wants to apply on their own without a recruiter?2 Or, what about the recruiters who can’t afford the Leopard List?

With the utmost respect for Leopard Solutions, I figured I could come up with a reasonably priced alternative that would cater to the general public. And that was the beginning of the Am Law Job Listings column.

Since November, I’ve published this column for free. Those who subscribe to my newsletter gain access to the column a few days before I post it for everyone else. However, the plan is to move this column over to a members-only section of my site, as I mentioned yesterday.

Anyone who subscribes to my newsletter already and/or who subscribes to my newsletter before I implement the members-only section will have free access to the site forever. Otherwise, the cost to subscribe will be $8.00/month. My goal is to use the money that I earn from the subscriptions to update the listings more often – either by myself or hiring someone to help. (I also take donations or gifts!)

I hope you agree that this is a useful service and its just one of the many perks to which members will have access.

Now, back to the present. Here is the latest round-up of Am Law 100 job listings. I’ve switched to publishing with Zoho Reports rather than Google Documents.3 I think it’s easier for searching and sorting but let me know if you have any feedback.

1 Yes, this is the same round-up that was password protected when published last week. This was a way to show my appreciation for subscribing. Unfortunately, this past time, a few of the subscribers had trouble accessing the password-protected post. I had already started to think that I may need to change how I distribute the listings and this incident sort of sped up the process.

2 Note: If a job seeker signs up to search the Leopard List job board or to receive e-mail job alerts, they see mostly jobs posted by recruiting companies. They do not have access to the database of jobs posted by those 460+ firms and 80+ Fortune 500 companies.

3 Ironically, I saw how nicely professionally Law Shucks tracks layoffs and I got inspired. Hat tip to them!

[Jobs] Legal Career Professionals – Recruiting, Career Services, etc.

If you’re a lawyer looking for alternative careers, I’d bookmark the NALP job postings page. On there, law schools and law firms post jobs relating to recruiting, lateral retention, professional development, and business development.  Please note, not all of the NALP listings require a JD.

For example, here are a few representative positions posted on December 4, 2009:

Law School

  • Associate/Assistant Director of Career Services. The John Marshall Law School in Chicago, Illinois, seeks a full-time professional to join its Career Services Office as an Assistant or Associate Director. Salary and title (Assistant Director or Associate Director) will be commensurate with experience. The Associate/Assistant Director will counsel students (J.D., LL.M. and M.S.) and alumni about career options and the job search process, educate students about the job market, critique resumes and cover letters, conduct mock interviews, and provide individualized career guidance. This position will report to the Assistant Dean for Career Services. The Associate/Assistant Director will perform outreach to legal employers and alumni to increase employment opportunities for students and graduates. In addition, the Assistant/Associate Director will develop and present student programming, create office publications, assist with the on-campus interviewing program, gather employment data, and prepare reports and marketing materials.

Law Firm

  • Training and Development Manager Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP, an international law firm of over 1,000 lawyers, has two new positions in the DC office of the Legal Talent Department: Training and Development Manager – Litigation and Training and Development Manager – Securities and Regulatory. These two positions offer a unique opportunity for highly motivated individuals to join a team-oriented department whose function is essential to the firm’s success.
    • The Training and Development Manager – Litigation Department develops and implements substantive legal training and other professional development programs, with a specific focus on the Litigation Department and the Washington, DC office. Co-manages the firm-wide women’s initiative and implements the initiative’s agenda. Works with the Director of Firmwide Legal Training and other members of the Training team to identify and address training needs, develop curricula, and implement programs to maximize effectiveness and quality and to ensure the continued professional development of the firm’s attorneys. Additional responsibilities include: constant evaluation of the content and format of training programs; staying abreast of trends in professional development for attorneys; providing referral services as necessary to attorneys with specific training and/or development needs; supporting the Firm’s mentoring programs; and managing the training and development team in the Washington, DC office.
    • The Training and Development Manager – Securities and Regulatory Practices develops and implements substantive legal training and other professional development programs, with a specific focus on the securities and regulatory practices and the Washington, DC office. Works with the Director of Firmwide Legal Training and other members of the Training team to identify and address training needs, develop curricula, and implement programs to maximize effectiveness and quality and to ensure the continued professional development of the firm’s attorneys. Additional responsibilities include: constant evaluation of the content and format of training programs; staying abreast of trends in professional development for attorneys; providing referral services as necessary to attorneys with specific training and/or development needs; and supporting the Firm’s mentoring programs.

Like always, these are excerpts.  The full postings are on the NALP website.

As some general advice for attorneys who want to segue out of associate life to one of these career-oriented positions, I always recommend to brainstorm on your motivations for applying, including your work experience (e.g. firm mentoring) and the attributes that you bring with your experience as an associate (e.g. familiarity with firm life, corresponding with partners, time management, etc.). Most likely, the skill set you will use in these positions will not be the same as the skill set attorneys use. Make sure you reflect on that, on why you want this type of position, and why you are a good match. It’s always easier to do this exercise before you start a new job than after you’ve already accepted it.

This series features job posts from around the web.

RecruiterEsq posts directly to the link where the job was found. In addition, RecruiterEsq posts pertinent information here for readers to assess interest.

Please do not apply to jobs directly through RecruiterEsq.

Please e-mail melissa@recruiteresq.com if you would like to post a relevant job in the legal industry and/or would like a job that is posted here to be removed. Thank you.